Monday, December 7, 2015

Pop, R&B, Country, Classical, Jazz, Folk: More Billboard LP Charts, Week Ending 7 August 1965: Saturday Music Club on Monday (Part 2)

Part one here.
I'm 51 now, so it seemed fair to take a slice from the middle of the half-century-old chart.


















Pop Album Chart continued:
51. Chad and Jeremy Before and After

the album's title track

52. Joan Baez 5


53. Cal Tjader Soul Sauce


54. Nat King Cole Unforgettable


55. Bert Kaempfert Blue Midnight


56. Getz/Gilberto


57. The Ventures on Stage


























Classical Chart: Chamber Music:
1. Stern, Istomin, Rose  Schubert: Trio No. 1


2. Juilliard Quartet Bartok: Quartets


3. Julian Bream Consort An Evening of Elizabethan Music


4. Friedman, Prince-Joseph Bach: Sonatas for Violin & Harpsichord


5. Kohon Quartet Ives: Quartets Nos. 1 & 2

And since the Kohon Quartet's recording isn't posted, here's the Emerson Quartet

Country Albums:
1. Connie Smith


2. Eddy Arnold The Easy Way


3. Buck Owens I've Got a Tiger by the Tail


4. The Return of Roger Miller


5. Sonny James I'll Keep Holding On


R&B Albums:
1. The Temptations Sing Smokey


2. Billy Stewart I Do Love You


3. Junior Walker and the All-Stars Play Shotgun


4. The Four Tops


5. Billy Preston The Most Exciting Organ Ever


6. Little Milton We're Gonna Make It


7. The Best of Sam Cooke, Volume 2


8. Aretha Franklin Yeah!!!


9. The Miracles Greatest Hits from the Beginning


10. Nancy Wilson Today--My Way



9 comments:

Bill Crider said...

I don't own any of these, either.

Todd Mason said...

This surprises me, but only a bit...over the years I've had copies of the Byrds, Stones, Dylan, most of the Beatles songs on UK releases, much of Hermits on a 50c copy of a best-of, the Franklin, and other, similar compilations of the Bach, Beach Boys, Miracles, Cooke and Four Tops sets (Motown always knew how to repackage)...but only four of essentially the same LPs and/or their CD descendants (MR. TAMBOURINE MAN the only one on both)(though the ANTHOLOGY LP of the Miracles pretty much subsumes FROM THE BEGINNING).

Todd Mason said...

And, thanks!

Jim C. said...

Don't it always seem to go
That you don't know what you've got
‘Til its gone.

Todd Mason said...

Kind of a recurring theme, and for a reason...

Charlie Ricci said...

I like a lot of these. I've always enjoyed bossa nova and Getz\Gilberto is the most famous example of a fine genre but I've always had a little trouble getting into it in a big way because of the language barrier. I know that's closed mindedness on my part but I can't help it and I didn't think it was worth taking a course in Portugese just to enhance my enjoyment of it but overall bossa nova is fine jazz.

Richard R. said...

I have all of the classical, most of the pop (I had Shotgun on a 45), none of the country. So over all, I figure I'm at about 80%.

Sergio (Tipping My Fedora) said...

That Aretha Franklin cover is just perfect!

Todd Mason said...

Charlie, I've never needed to have the lyrics translated for most songs in foreign languages, though it's nice to know what they're singing about...I've been known to learn songs phonetically...in Hawaiian, Hebrew, and a few other languages (Miriam Makeba nudging the Weavers in the variety of half-learned lyrical sounds).

Richard, I'm not too surprised, but still impressed, that you'd have all five of the chamber albums...I'd probably have the Roger Miller if the most famous song on it wasn't so omnipresent, and I certainly like the Buck Owens record.

Sergio--if only CBS took such care with her repetoire and general presentation...not trying to force her to be the new Dinah Washington and letting her be herself, as her best soul records at CBS ("Take it Like You Give It" or "Soulville" or, to a slightly lesser extent, her covers of "If I Had a Hammer" or "Trouble in Mind" on this record) are on par with her classics recorded shortly after at Atlantic...even the audience sounds and club setting for this record were fabricated. But I don't think she ever had a better LP sleeve, indeed.