Friday, March 19, 2010

Friday's "Forgotten" Magazines


This is the ineptly covered first issue of Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine I both owned and read...there were a Lot of inept covrs on AHMM in the HSD Publications and early Davis Publications decades, when it was decided that contributors names couldn't draw nearly as well as badly-cropped photos of Hitchcock. I picked it up, along with the August 1968 issue (with a less amateurish caricature cover), at a booksale in 1976.

The contents:
"Shadow Against Shadow" by Edward Y. Breese;
"Fat Jow and the Demon" by Robert Alan Blair;
"A Flower in Her Hair" by Pauline C. Smith;
"You Can Bet on Ruby Martinson" by Henry Slesar;
"Second Talent" by James Holding;
"The Creator of Spud Moran" by John Lutz;
"Nobody to Play With" by Irwin Porges;
"The Philanderer" by Lawrence E. Orin;
"Night Storm" by Max Van Derveer;
"Good-Bye Now" by Gil Brewer;
"You Can't Fight City Hall, Pete" by Bill Pronizini;
"What Difference Now" by Clayton Matthews;
"A Nice Wholesome Girl" by Robert Colby;
"Step No. VII" by Harold Rolseth.

My copy is in storage, but I remember the rather famous Holding story pretty well, and the Slesar (part of a series about minor "operator" Martinson), and that the Lutz. Colby, and Pronzini were wryly funny. The Porges is the kind of story I thought of when, later, I read Barry Malzberg dismissively refer to a the kind of plot that was stupid enough to sell to AHMM, a clumsy misfire about a mentally-retarded man and the machinations and improbable coincidences played out to ensure that he had a playmate. The Brewer, iirc, was effectively grim.

AHMM in those years was not as hardboiled as the ghost of Manhunt, still lingering, nor quite as much as Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine, still making its lower-budgedted way in the world, but AHMM was certainly more likely to be grim and naturalistic than Ellery Queen's in Dannay's last years there or even than The Saint Mystery Magazine's last issues of its penulitmate (iF I have this straight) US version of that frequently-revived title. Given all the talent assembled above, it's remarkable how little AHMM was paying...while EQMM was paying relatively well.

Four magazines from Londonderry Junior High School library, late 1977 (images courtesy of the fine NooSFere site):





My friend Steven Durost (see previous post) found the Fantastic issue in our school library, where it (and the other three) had apparently been kicking around for years, left behind perhaps by a teacher...but never actually added to the collection. So when Steve turned the Fantastic back in, the librarian, seeing I was interested in it, gave it to me along with the other three old issues kicking around. You might note that the only fiction-writer not to be noted on the F&SF cover turned out to be the commercially biggest star in the issue, eventually...Gary Jennings, he of Aztec and Spangle a few years down the road.

You can see, I think, why I fell in love with Jack Gaughan's art for the newly upgraded physical package of Galaxy and If, sibling magazines (If had folded by the time I found these, incorporated into the faltering Galaxy). Interesting magazines, but not as good as the more eclectic Fantastic and F&SF...

Title: Fantastic, June 1971
4 • Editorial (Fantastic, June 1971) • essay by Ted White, header by Mike Hinge
6 • The Byworlder (Part 1 of 2) • serial by Poul Anderson
7 • The Byworlder (Part 1 of 2) • interior artwork by Mike Hinge
58 • War of the Doom Zombies • short story by Richard A. Lupoff [as by Ova Hamlet]
59 • War of the Doom Zombies • interior artwork by Bill Graham
66 • No Exit • shortstory by Larry Niven and [the eventual] Jean Marie Stine [as by Hank Stine and Larry Niven]
67 • No Exit • interior artwork by Steve Harper
70 • The Man Who Faded Away • shortstory by Richard E. Peck
71 • The Man Who Faded Away • interior artwork by Jeff Jones
76 • The Lurker in the Locked Bedroom • shortstory by Edward Bryant [as by Ed Bryant]
77 • The Lurker in the Locked Bedroom • interior artwork by Michael Kaluta [as by Michael Wm. Kaluta]
82 • War of Human Cats • (1940 Fantastic Adventures reprint) • novelet by Festus Pragnell
82 • War of Human Cats (reprint) • (1940) • interior artwork by Jay Jackson
98 • These Things Called Genes • (1940) • filler essay by uncredited (Ray Palmer?)
99 • Literary Swordsmen & Sorcerers: Skald in the Post Oaks • essay by L. Sprague de Camp
109 • Science Fiction in Dimension: New Perspective • essay by Alexei Panshin
115 • . . . According to You (Fantastic, June 1971) • letter column conducted by Ted White

Title: The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, November 1971
4 • A Feast for the Gods • novelette by Poul Anderson and Karen Anderson
18 • Books (F&SF, November 1971) • essay by Joanna Russ
18 •   Review: The Dialectic of Sex by Shulamith Firestone • book review by Joanna Russ
19 •   Review: Abyss by Kate Wilhelm • book review by Joanna Russ
21 •   Review: The Light Fantastic by Harry Harrison • book review by Joanna Russ
21 •   Review: Partners in Wonder by Harlan Ellison and others • book review by Joanna Russ
23 •   Review: The Day After Judgment by James Blish • book review by Joanna Russ
24 • Bind Your Hair • (1964) • novelette by Robert Aickman
45 • Cartoon: "Where were you for all those years?" • interior artwork by Gahan Wilson (a dying, elderly woman shouting at a fairy godmother hovering over the deathbed)
46 • Only Who Can Make a Tree? • short story by Philip José Farmer
56 • Whom the Gods Love • [Jan Darzek] • short story by Lloyd Biggle, Jr.
71 • Films (F&SF, November 1971) Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; Peter Rabbit and the Tales of Beatrix Potter; brief notes • essay by Baird Searles
73 • The Price of Pain-Ease • [Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser] • (1970) • short story by Fritz Leiber
89 • How We Pass the Time in Hell • short story by Gary Jennings
101 • The Left Hand of the Electron • [Science] • essay by Isaac Asimov
111 • That Boy • [The People] • novelette by Zenna Henderson
144 • F&SF Competition #1 • essay by uncredited

Title: Galaxy Magazine, May-June 1971
2 • Letters 3 • [Editor's Page) • letter column/notes conducted by Ejler Jakobsson
4 • Tip of the Iceberg • novelette by Ernest Hill
4 • Tip of the Iceberg • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
28 • The No-Wind Spotted Tiger Planet • shortstory by W. Macfarlane
37 • The Verity File • short story by Theodore Sturgeon
51 • Falling Through the World • short story by Duncan Lunan
51 • Falling Through the World • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
68 • The Message • [The Listeners] • novelette by James E. Gunn
68 • The Message • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
95 • Galaxy Book Shelf (Galaxy, May-June 1971) • [Galaxy Bookshelf] • essay by Algis Budrys
103 • Rate of Exchange • short story by Jack Sharkey
103 • Rate of Exchange • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
108 • A Time of Changes (Part 3 of 3) • serial by Robert Silverberg
108 • A Time of Changes (Part 3 of 3) • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
167 • The Buyer • shortstory by Larry Eisenberg
167 • The Buyer • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
169 • Galaxy Stars (Galaxy, May-June 1971) • [Galaxy's Stars] • essay by uncredited
171 • Price of Leisure • shortstory by David R. Bunch
171 • Price of Leisure • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan

Title:If, March-April 1971
2 • Hue and Cry (If, March-April 1971) • [Hue and Cry] • editorial/letter column conducted by Ejler Jakobsson
4 • Gambler's Choice • [A.E.S.O.P.] • short story by Bob Shaw
4 • Gambler's Choice • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
24 • One-Generation New World • novelette by W. Macfarlane
24 • One-Generation New World • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
60 • One-Generation New World [2] • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
68 • Slaves of Silver • shortstory by Gene Wolfe
68 • Slaves of Silver • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
84 • Star Crossing • novella by Gregory Benford and Donald Franson [as by Donald Franson and Greg Benford]
84 • Star Crossing • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
134 • Retief, Insider • [Retief] • novelette by Keith Laumer
134 • Retief, Insider • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
159 • Casey's Transfer • short story by Lee Saye
159 • Casey's Transfer • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
163 • Reading Room (If, March-April 1971) • [Reading Room] • essay by Lester del Rey
164 •   Review: Ringworld by Larry Niven • book review by Lester del Rey
165 •   Review: The Stone God Awakens by Philip José Farmer • book review by Lester del Rey
166 •   Review: Children of Tomorrow by A. E. van Vogt • book review by Lester del Rey
167 •   Review: The Glass Teat by Harlan Ellison • book review by Lester del Rey
168 •   Review: The Universe Makers by Donald A. Wollheim • book review by Lester del Rey
169 •   Review: Nightmare Age by Frederik Pohl • book review by Lester del Rey
169 • SF Calendar (If, March-April 1971) • calendar of fannish events by uncredited
170 • Space Slick • novelette by Gerard Rejskind
170 • Space Slick • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan

(Indices from ISFDB, which also features this Visco image of the F&SF wraparound cover:)



The Fantastic issue has the first of the rather unpopular De Camp takes on Robert E. Howard...and fine early stories from Richard Peck and Ed Bryant. And an uncollected Stine and Niven which I presented to, at the time, my completist Niven-reading father.

The F&SF featured a whole lot of revelations, including reviews of books my father had picked up and which I'd dipped into or read through (I already knew Joanna Russ from "Useful Phrases for the Tourist," for example). Also, the magazine was the first with the same horrible printers that EQMM had been using, cheap but with absolutely nothing else to recommend them...probably the same folks who had been giving cheap printing in Holyoke, MA, a bad reputation (if a thrify one) for decades.



This would be similar to my father's copy, inherted by me, of an Analog, the first I recall seeing. Cenetery World being rather minor Simak, "Pigeon City" is the story to take away from this issue...

Title: Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, November 1972
4 • Legalize Pot? • [Editorial) • essay by Ben Bova
8 • Cemetery World (Part 1 of 3) • serial by Clifford D. Simak
8 • Cemetery World (Part 1 of 3) • interior artwork by John Schoenherr
34 • Cemetery World (Part 1 of 3) [2] • interior artwork by John Schoenherr
52 • Cemetery World (Part 1 of 3) [3] • interior artwork by John Schoenherr
55 • In Times to Come (Analog, November 1972) • house ad by uncredited
57 • The Parties of the First Part • short story by Richard F. DeBaun
58 • The Parties of the First Part • interior artwork by Leo Summers
62 • Pollution Probe • [Science Fact] • essay by G. Harry Stine
76 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer • [Science Fact] • essay by Loren E. Morey
76 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer • interior artwork by Linda Morey Papanicolaou
79 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer [2] • interior artwork by Linda Morey Papanicolaou
80 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer [3] • interior artwork by Linda Morey Papanicolaou
81 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer [4] • interior artwork by Linda Morey Papanicolaou
82 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer [5] • interior artwork by Linda Morey Papanicolaou
83 • Cyrano de Bergerac: The First Aerospace Engineer [6] • interior artwork by Linda Morey Papanicolaou
86 • Pigeon City • novelette by Jesse Miller
86 • Pigeon City • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
98 • Pigeon City [2] • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
107 • Pigeon City [3] • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
117 • Request for Proposal • shortstory by Anthony R. Lewis
117 • Request for Proposal • interior artwork by Frank Kelly Freas [as by Kelly Freas ]
127 • The Analytical Laboratory: August 1972 • [The Analytical Laboratory] • essay by Ben Bova
128 • Miscount • shortstory by Carolyn Gloeckner [as by C. M. Gloeckner ]
130 • F.O.D. • novelette by James Durham [as by Jim Durham ]
130 • F.O.D. • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
148 • F.O.D. [2] • interior artwork by Jack Gaughan
157 • In the Matter of the Assassin Merefirs • short story by Ken W. Purdy
157 • In the Matter of the Assassin Merefirs • interior artwork by Frank Kelly Freas [as by Kelly Freas ]
165 • The Reference Library (Analog, November 1972) • [The Reference Library] • essay by P. Schuyler Miller
167 •   Review: The Wind from the Sun by Arthur C. Clarke • book review by P. Schuyler Miller
168 •   Review: The Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov • book review by P. Schuyler Miller
170 •   Review: The Chameleon Corps by Ron Goulart • book review by P. Schuyler Miller
171 •   Review: Breed to Come by Andre Norton • book review by P. Schuyler Miller
172 • Brass Tacks (Analog, November 1972) • [Brass Tacks] • letter column conducted by Ben Bova

I started buying new issues of AHMM with the January, 1978 issue (still only 75c) and new issues of F&SF (March) and Fantastic (July...as a quarterly, it dated Far Out) shortly thereafter, and all else followed as I could find and afford them.

Patti Abbott's blog might or might not have an official list on this traveling week for her for the Friday "Forgotten" Books roundelay. Patti had been kind enough to send me several 1970-era F&SFs, including a copy of the issue above, inspiring this nostalgic entry...

10 comments:

August West said...

I remember reading "A Nice Wholesome Girl" by Robert Colby. It's a fabulous story.

Todd Mason said...

Did you read it in this issue, or in an anthology or Colby collection (did he publish one other than the PAINT THE TOWN book?)?

August West said...

I am also lucky enough to have this AHMM issue.

Todd Mason said...

I'll have to dig around...Colby is Yet Another deserving more books in print than he has had (wonder if that story made it into one of the AHMM anthologies from Dell...)

K. A. Laity said...

Wow -- they couldn't get a better cover for Hitch than that? I never saw the mags, but read the collections avidly. My intro to a lot of writers as a child.

Todd Mason said...

Yes, they could, Kate...but the covers ranged widely between the utterly inept such as that to relatively good caricatures (such as the one which graced the next issue, as I note)...this was the same period in which the interiors of both EQMM and THE SAINT were so sloppily printed that they were hard to read...at least AHMM looked good on the inside (except perhaps for the illustrations, which were also pretty uninspired for the most part, but usually functional). The January 1978 cover, the first new issue I saw on a newsstand, had a an actually well-executed photo cover, but that was still rare a decade after this issue.

And, as I've noted in many places now, there were at least three major sorts of HITCHCOCK anthologies...the Random House (mostly) ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS: anthologies, edited by Robert Arthur till his death on the cusp of the '70s and then by Harold Q. Masur till Hitchcock's death (they were great); the YA ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S _____ (such as MONSTER MUSEUM and SINSITER SPIES) anthologies edited also by Arthur, then by successors, mostly for Viking Press, iirc, which were excellent and interestingly illustrated except in the downgraded and pointlessly abridged paperback editions, and the adult-oriented ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S ___________ (such as NOOSE REPORT and DATES WITH DEATH) anthologies published by Dell, which were best-ofs from AHMM. Davis Publications, after buying AHMM in the mid-'70s, started doing fat ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S ANTHOLOGY issues in the manner of their ELLERY QUEEN'S ANTHOLOGY issues, which were published in hardcover initially by the Dial Press, which made them look the Random House PRESENTS: series, which latter was also confusingly reprinted in two paperbacks each by Dell. And the AHMM best-ofs weren't too shabby, either.

The recent AHMM covers are actually pretty sharp, but most of the Penny/Crosstown/Dell fiction magazines are covered pretty well these days.

George said...

Jack Gaughan was second only to EMSH in my pantheon of great SF artists, Todd. I can't understand why someone hasn't issued an art book of his wonderful covers!

Richard R. said...

Great post, Todd. I had that issue of Analog, but I don't remember a thing about the contents, only the cover.

Evan Lewis said...

Pretty sure I have that F&SF (for the Farmer story) and the Fantastic (from when I was a Conaniac).

Todd Mason said...

George--the upside of Gaughan's term as essentially The artist at the GALAXY group was that he was able to spread himself over the best-produced issues the magazines would see...with more creative freedom than he was usually afforded at, say, Ace. The downside was that they were working him to death, he noted later, and with many last-minute assignments.

Rick--Well, CEMETERY WORLD really isn't very memorable...but "Pigeon City" is worth revisiting if you ever pick that issue up again...Miller had a website up, and might still, but I'm not aware of his ever quite making a similar splash again after this story.

Evan--Well, the Howard enthusiasts do see to have a legitimate beef with de Camp, who of course had written some "posthumous collaborations" with Howard (and with Lin Cater and Glenn Nyquist, iirc...I'm too sleepy to feel like looking the latter up to see if he was really Bjorn or Sven, as I suspect...), at least as far as his assessment of Howard's mental state goes. But, aside from the interesting (if possibly erroneous) first essay on Howard and a typically largely wrong where not dealing with the crashingly obvious Panshin essay, the FANTASTIC issue is a wealth of interesting reading, as I certainly thought at the time I first read it (Steve Durost like the pulp reprint by Pragnell the best...I thought it the weakest bit, but it does have...koff...some needle illustration for those that seek same). I thought the Lupoff/"Hamlet" hilarious, even with limited prior experience of the kind of generic sword and sorcery/sf crossover story it mocked.

The evocation of the Three Stooges in the Farmer might be a little Too faithful. Chesley Bonestell did the F&SF cover, btw, and Dan Adkins the FANTASTIC.

And everyone should check out the NooSFere cover-gallery/index gloss, if you haven't...though the FictionMags Index data as reformatted on Phil Stephensen-Payne's Galactic Central is also providing a gratifying number of cover images these days.