Wednesday, June 2, 2021

Short Story Wednesday: Stories from Three (+) Magazines, Anthologized: Robert Bloch, John Cheever, C.B. Gilford, Damon Knight, Kathe Koja, Ursula K. Le Guin, Donald E. Westlake et al.

Three books taken from three magazines: Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine--the first anthology from the magazine; Playboy--a sort of mid-stream collection of mostly sfnal work from the magazine, and one of the rather impressive Playboy Press paperback originalsand Amazing Stories, a signing-off of the magazine as it had been published for over a decade by TSR...


  • Publication: Alfred Hitchcock's A Hangman's Dozen (the first edition only, photographed here, as AH Presents: AHD, but Random House probably put pressure on Dell and HSD Publications to stop infringing on the RH-franchise title-form for their paperback original anthologies...at least till RH discontinued the series with the death of Hitchcock) Never before in paperback...and never in hardcover! (But the latter wouldn't be seen as a selling point.)
  • Editor: attributed to Alfred Hitchcock; probably? edited by AHMM editor Lisa Belknap or publisher (and successor editor) Richard Decker
  • Date: 1962
  • Catalog ID: 3428
  • Publisher: Dell
  • Price: $0.50; Pages: 222; Format: 
    pb
  • Notes: Despite the title there are 15 stories [says ISFDB...executioners can ad three at no extra charge.]
The first best-of Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine Dell would publish, in a long string, while the magazine belonged to HSD Publications; when it was sold to Davis Publications, who had been publishing Ellery Queen's MM since the turn of the '60s, Dell's Delacorte hardcover imprint would issue the library-aimed hardcover versions of Davis's Alfred Hitchcock Anthology fat reprint issues (and, after Davis Publications' collapse, they sold their fiction magazine to Dell...hich in turn sold its magazines, mostly world-puzzle magazines, but also fiction and astrology [also fiction!] to puzzle magazine publisher Penny Press, which still publishes them)...and, coincidentally, the first I read...my father picked it up for me from a shady bookstore in Boston where stripped paperbacks were sold for something like a quarter apiece. The Bradbury story is an anomaly...AHMM wouldn't regularly publish reprints till the early '80s and had only done so sporadically since the mid '80s. As I was, as I've noted, a horror-seeking device when 10yo, the stories that resonated most with me were the horror and borderline suspense stories, such as the C. B. Gilford (never mess with the shade of your ex-wife) and the Matheson (always look closely at the family portraits in odd-seeming small towns), and of course the Bradbury. But the Westlakes and Slesars also made an impression...Charles Einstein, of course, was the somewhat older brother of comedian/actors Bob Einstein and Albert "Brooks".

Part of another lengthy series of paperbacks, from Playboy Press when it was still active and largely devoted to books related to the parent magazine, and ready to tout the range of material they featured beyond and between the airbrushing.  Anthologies that put together Damon Knight (whose bitter story lends the book its title; an exercise in more directly expressed rage than most of his work, where anger is usually leavened with wit and no little irony), John Cheever and Ken Purdy are less common than they might be, despite Cheever and gearhead Purdy both having an affinity for at least borderline sf on occasion in their careers. Also, some horror mixed in with this "science fiction" collection, presumably more PP's nonchalance than worry that the book wouldn't sell as well with a "sf and fantasy" label.


Amazing Stories: The Anthology ed. Kim Mohan (Tor 0-312-89048-6, Jun ’95 [May ’95], $13.95, 320pp, tp) Anthology of 13 stories, 8 original and 5 reprinted from Amazing, with an introduction by Mohan and a reprint of an autobiographical piece by Robert Bloch as an afterword.
This anthology was essentially the Lost Last issue of the TSR Amazing, as the Dungeons and Dragons game/book publishers finally decided to quit expensively publishing and ineptly distributing Amazing, which they had bough from the ashes of Ultimate Publications in the early '80s just in time for Steven Spielberg to offer a tidy sum to purchase a/v rights to the title of the magazine and the stories they had under copyright for what turned out to be an unsurprisingly terrible and perhaps surprisingly unpopular tv series Spielberg had been careful to have NBC commit to two full seasons of (later terrible Spielberg series were not given such contractual largess).  It would be several years between the publication of this volume and the Wizards of the Coast (who took on a number of TSR projects) brief revival (and a longer period before the current revival, in its turn somewhat stymied  by the publisher's medical misfortunes).  The Robert Bloch story reprint is an amusing example of the kind of odd rigors the magazine had tended to see...published in one of the first higher-budget, semi-slick issues from then-long-term publisher Ziff-Davis, crime-fiction writer and longtime ZD editorial staffer turned editor placed this utterly non-science fictional horror story in Amazing rather than its companion Fantastic; it's an impressive horror story, but an odd choice for the sf magazine in when that magazine has two fantasy-oriented companions to fill (the reprinted Bloch memoir has a bit of a jest with the elder companion magazine, the pulp Fantastic Adventures, which would be merged with Fantastic at the end of 1954).  Kim Mohan produced a decent magazine that was rarely seen on general newsstands and selling very poorly as a result; TSR neither knew nor cared about selling a magazine that wasn't devoted to their games and the gaming audience.

More later, but as too often, there's too much else that needs doing to allow for more here now! Please see Patti Abbott's blog for more of today's short fiction entries.


Friday, April 30, 2021

FFB: 2020 Best of the Year volumes (and a couple of 2021 items drawing on 2019 publications as well, and one 2020 book looking back at 2018...so far)--future forgotten books?


As noted previously:

The Best Horror of the Year: Volume 12, edited by Ellen Datlow (a series which directly followed Datlow's co-edited annual of horror and fantasy fiction and poetry for 21 consecutive volumes)

Best New Horror #30, edited by Stephen Jones (this series is on a year's lag compared to the others, aside for The Pushcart Prize volume, and this year Rich Horton's delayed annual--the 2020 Best New Horror volume draws from 2018; the first several volumes of the Jones annual were co-edited by Ramsey Campbell)

The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror, Volume 1, edited by Paula Guran, after ten volumes of an annual with a nearly identical title for another publisher, and three volumes of a paranormal romance/romantic fantasy BOTY before that set.

Year's Best Hardcore Horror 5: Going Global, edited by Randy Chandler and Cheryl Mullenax

...we seemingly having lost in the last several years Best British Horror, The Best Australian Horror (which included New Zealand writers and publication), and the Year's Best Weird Fiction annuals and attempts at annuals, rather a pity...though it's amusing and a bit sad we have essentially four horror annuals and no annual devoted exclusively to the full range of fantasy fiction--as not a few have noted in recent years. I think also that perhaps it's time for a bit more subtlety in horror annual covers...Year's Best Weird Fiction had in-one's-face but less garish covers for most of its volumes, as did some of the early volumes of Best New Horror...I understand the nostalgic pull of the 1950s horror comics covers on recent Best New Horror volumes, and am aware that Year's Best Weird Fiction is no longer with us, but I don't think the covers sunk that annual, any more than than they hurt sales of the DAW Books annual in the '70s or '80s nor those early '90s Best New Horrors...

But, then, we lost the O. Henry Prize Stories volume for a year, after series editor Laura Furman stepped down with the 100th anniversary volume. The new editor has released a preliminary description that manages to get the historical details of the O. Henry series wrong, while proudly describing, without admitting this, a new system of single guest editors each year/volume, which apes the slightly older Best American Short Stories, as opposed to the three-writer O. Henry panels of recent decades; for its part Best American Short Stories has inspired at Houghton Mifflin (now also Harcourt)  over the last couple of decades a flock of other "Best American" annuals, which in its turn has already shut down some of the most interesting of those offshoots (such as Best American Comics and Best American Non-Required Reading).

And we lost all but one of the crime-fiction annuals some years before 2020, leaving only The Best American Mystery Stories; in 2021, we should see at least two annuals in CF, with the Michele Slung/Otto Penzler team moving on to edit a new series for Penzler's own publishing line, after disagreements with HM Harcourt, who are launching a Best American Mystery and Suspense with series editor Steph Cha.

The Best American Short Stories, BA Essays, BA Science and Nature Writing are all interesting enough for me to pick up in a flush year (I'm not passionate nor completist enough to seek out also the travel, sports and food-writing volumes--my loss); BA Poetry, like BA Magazine Writing, are products of other publishers, and Best American Magazine Writing is the large-budget-periodical correspondent to the Pushcart Prize volumes, which hope to gather the best from small-press publications; both have their questionable self-restrictions/qualifications (Magazine has a steep entry fee, and chooses in the 2020 volume to give the fiction prize, seemingly all but an afterthought, to a Paris Review short, while Pushcart 2021 offers among others a story from Zoetrope All-Story, a small press by dint of having major film/wine guy, Francis Ford Coppola, behind it rather than the board of directors largely left over from the era of George Plimpton and the Aga Khan's stewardship at Paris), and all can at times seem to be destined for coffee tables and eventually attics than avid reading, which, however deftly or poorly edited, seems also the fates of most annuals. The public libraries which bother to buy them often seem to discard them more often than they would in previous decades, when keeping as many volumes of the series on the shelves seemed a point of pride...they may not be the first or last word on what Lasts among the literature, but they are usually at least interesting as snapshots of their eras. However, the new volumes as they appear seem to get relatively few reviews, even on the web (there certainly are some, but most passing or capsule at best...this bit of typing is more a notice-taking and eventually a contents listing than, certainly, a review, though those might follow). 

I wonder if the lack of an O. Henry has helped the sales of Best Debut Short Stories 2020, from the O. Henry volume's former co-sponsor PEN America, the writer's group. Happily, the impressive writer Nicholas Royle continues to be able to put together Best British Short Stories, a bit smaller than the US/Canadian correspondent (do they flip a coin for the Jamaican, Bermudan and Barbadan stories?). Come to think of it, isn't it interesting that the horror, crime fiction and science fiction/fantasy annuals are now more likely to be edited by literati who are not fiction writers themselves than in most previous decades...losing writer/editor Gardner Dozois a handful of years after Ed Gorman and, more than a decade earlier, Karl Edward Wagner and Terry Carr and Donald Wollheim, along with Ramsey Campbell, Robert Silverberg, Maxim Jakubowski, Gerald W. Page, and other survivors having stepped away, often when the Reaper came for their publishing houses rather than they themselves...

Among the extant speculative fiction annuals, we retain Jonathan Strahan and his The Year's Best Science Fiction, Volume 1, which follows for a new publisher 13 volumes of The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year,  and before that series continuing, usually with Karen Haber, a few volumes of the fantasy and sf annuals she had started with her husband, Robert Silverberg, as well as a short-lived pendant novellas annual

And, though his most recent volume has been delayed by his publisher, Rich Horton's series of ten, soon likely to be eleven, annual The Year's Best Science Fiction & Fantasy has also been a notable continuing contribution, which followed three volumes each of  Fantasy: The Best of the Year and Science Fiction: The Best of the Year and a single volume in 2010 gathering a best-of sf published on the web in 2008. 

John Joseph Adams has been the series editor for The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy for six volumes starting in 2015; Neil Clarke has offered five volumes of The Best Science Fiction of the Year starting in 2016. 

It looks as if David Afsharirad's military/adventure sf annual best-of is as gone as the gay/lesbian focused BOTY fantasy/sf annuals from Steve Berman and co-editors...the reprint erotica year's best annuals from Maxim Jakubowski or Susie Bright or Rachel Kramer Bussel seem not to have heirs, either, but Bussel and others are publishing what seem to be original-fiction anthologies with similar titles. 

I hope to augment the rather casually-assembled data below, from ISFDB, WorldCat and other sources, with some uniform fonts and formats that give the original publication sources and dates (when available), and perhaps even some actual reviews...the wheel grinds slow, but perhaps not quite to the recent complete halt...


The Best Horror of the Year: Volume Twelve • [The Best Horror of the Year • 12] • anthology by Ellen Datlow

Contents



CONTENTS

  • Introduction of Horror in 2018  STEPHEN JONES
  • The House  PETER BELL
  • Smiling Man  SIMON KURT UNSWORTH
  • Holiday Reading  ROSALIE PARKER
  • Resonant  Evil GRAHAM MASTERTON
  • Redriff  MICHAEL CHISLETT
  • The Blink  NICHOLAS ROYLE
  • The Deep Sea Swell  JOHN LANGAN
  • Sisters Rise  CHRISTOPHER HARMAN
  • The Run of the Town  RAMSEY CAMPBELL
  • The Marvellous Talking Machine  ALISON LITTLEWOOD
  • Who’s Got the Button?  JAMES WADE
  • The Typewriter  RIO YOUERS
  • The Keepers of the Lighthouse  KEN MACKENZIE
  • The Hungry Grass  TRACY FAHEY
  • Ghostly Studies, Dr. Grace, and The Diodati Society  DANIEL McGACHEY
  • It Never Looks Like Drowning  DAMIEN ANGELICA WALTERS
  • The Window of Erich Zann  MICHAEL MARSHALL SMITH
  • Posterity  MARK SAMUELS
  • Octoberland  THANA NIVEAU
  • Porson’s Piece  REGGIE OLIVER
  • He Sings of Salt and Wormwood  BRIAN HODGE
  • Virginia Story  CAITLÍN R. KIERNAN
  • The Virgin Mary Well  PETER BELL
  • Necrology  STEPHEN JONES & KIM NEWMAN

The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror: Volume 1 • [The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror • 1] • anthology by Paula Guran

Contents





GOING GLOBAL: INTRODUCTION by Randy Chandler & Cheryl Mullenax

FEAST FOR SMALL PIECES by Hailey Piper

GODDESS OF GALLOWS by Kristopher Triana

LATE NIGHT INCIDENT AT THE WHITE TRASH MOTEL by Duane Bradley

A NEW MOTHER’S GUIDE TO RAISING AN ABOMINATION by Gwendolyn Kiste

UPPER CRUST by Michael Paul Gonzalez

REDLESS by Annie Neugebauer

A TOUCH OF MADNESS by Tim Waggoner

PARADISUM VOLUPTATIS by Joanna Koch

RADIX MALORUM by Sean Patrick Hazlett

LACKERS by Leo X. Roberson

WHY DO BIRDS SUDDENLY APPEAR? by Rajiv Moté

DARJEELING by Syon Das

MRSA ME by Alicia Hilton

WHAT DID YOU DO TO THE CHILDREN? by David L Tamarin

HAVE A HEART by Matthew V. Brockmeyer

SWINGS AND SUSPENSIONS by D.A. Xiaolin Spires

KIRTI by Alessandro Manzetti

THE TEA AND SUGAR TRAIN by DEBORAH SHELDON

SCREAMS FOR STARGIRL by Ben Pienaar

QUEER WEATHER by Scáth Beorh


Table of Contents:

  • Justice / Pamela Blackwood
  • Home Movie / Jerry M. Burger
  • Deportees / James Lee Burke
  • Second cousins /Michael Cebula
  • Surrogate Initiative / Brian Cox
  • Shanty Falls / Doug Crandell
  • Duelist / David Dean
  • Security / Jeffery Deaver
  • Rhonda and Clyde / John M. Floyd
  • On Little Terry Road / Tom Franklin
  • See humble and die / Richard Helms
  • All this distant beauty / Ryan David Jahn
  • Miss Martin / Sheila Kohler
  • The Most powerful weapon / Jake Lithua
  • Baddest outlaws / Rick McMahan
  • What ever happened to Lorna Winters / Lisa Morton
  • Girl with an ax / John Sandford
  • Pretzel logic / David B. Schlosser
  • Nightbound / Wallace Stroby
  • The Last hit / Robin Yocum




Contents:
Godmother tea / Selena Anderson --
The apartment / T.C. Boyle --
A faithful but melancholy account of several
barbarities lately committed / Jason Brown --
Sibling rivalry / Michael Byers --
The nanny / Emma Cline --
Halloween / Marian Crotty --
Something Street / Carolyn Ferrell --
This is pleasure / Mary Gaitskill --
In the event / Meng Jin --
The children / Andrea Lee --
Rubberdust / Sarah Thankam Mathews --
It's not you / Elizabeth McCracken --
Liberté / Scott Nadelson --
Howl Palace / Leigh Newman --
The nine-tailed fox explains / Jane Pek --
The hands of dirty children / Alejandro Puyana --
Octopus VII / Anna Reeser --
Enlightenment / William Pei Shih --
Kennedy / Kevin Wilson --
The special world / Tiphanie Yanique.

Responsibility: selected from U.S. and Canadian magazines
by Curtis Sittenfeld with Heidi Pitlor;
with an introduction by Sittenfeld.



How to bartend / Rabih Alameddine --
Ghost museum / Elvis Bego --
Driving as metaphor / Rachel Cusk --
The humanoid stain / Barbara Ehrenreich --
After the three-moon era / Gary Fincke --
Cosmic latte / Ron Huett --
A street full of splendid strangers / Leslie Jamison --
A letter to Robinson Crusoe / Jamaica Kincaid --
Maly Trostinets / Joseph Leo Koerner --
Body language / Alex Marzano-Lesnevich --
A thing about cancer / Clinton Crockett Peters --
The other Leopold / Susan Fox Rogers --
To grieve is to carry another time / Matthew Salesses --
77 Sunset me / Peter Schjeldahl --
Under the sign of Susan / A.O. Scott --
Semantic drift / Lionel Shriver --
Ode al vento occidentale / Mark Sullivan --
Holiday review / Mark Sundeen --
My pink lake and other digressions / Alison Townsend --
Bed / David L. Ulin --
Breathe / Jerald Walker --
The unfound door / Stephanie Powell Watts --
Soul-error / Philip Weinstein --
Was Shakespeare a woman? / Elizabeth Winkler.

edited and with an introduction by André Aciman ; Robert Atwan, series editor.





Description:    xxviii, 343 pages ; 21 cm
Contents:    Foreword --
Introduction --
A journey into the animal mind (from The Atlantic) / Ross Andersen --
Sleep no more (from Wind) / Kelly Clancy --
What remains (from the California Sunday magazine) / Daniel Duane --
With a simple twist, a "Magic" material is now the big thing in physics (from Quanta magazine) / David H. Freedman --
The eighth continent (from the New Yorker) / Rivka Galchen --
The tumultuous history of a mysterious brain (from the Atlantic) / Bahar Gholipour --
Younger longer (from The New Yorker) / Adam Gopnik --
Right under our noses (from Wires) / Sara Harrison --
I, language robot (from Los Angeles review of books) / Patrick House --
Beauty of the beasts (from the New York Times magazine) / Ferris Jarr 
Ghosts of the future (from The Washington post ) / Sarah Kaplan --
Intelligent ways to search for extraterrestrials (from New Yorker) / Adam Mann --
Total eclipse (From Aeon) / Deanna Csomo McCool --
We have fire everywhere (from the New York Times magazine) / Jon Mooallem --
Vaccines reimagined (from Scientific American) / Melinda Wenner Moyer --
New blood (from the New Yorker) / Siddhartha Mukherjee --
The day the dinosaurs died (from The New Yorker) / Douglas Preston --
The final five percent (from Longreads) / Tim Requarth --
The next word (from The New Yorker) / John Seabrook --
Troubled treasure (from Science magazine) / Joshua Sokol --
The hidden heroines of chaos (from Quanta magazine) / Joshua Sokol --
The hunt for planet nine (from Longreads) / Shannon Stirone --
A different kind of theory of everything (from The New Yorker) / Natalie Wolchover --
The brain that remade itself (from OneZero) / Andrew Zaleski
Series Title:    Best American series.
Responsibility:    edited and with and introduction by Michio Kaku; 
Jaime Green, series editor


The Best American Magazine Writing 2020

Edited by Sid Holt for the American Society of Magazine Editors

Columbia University Press

Introduction, by Jonathan Dorn, presidentAmerican Society of Magazine Editors
Acknowledgments, by Sid Holt, chief executive, American Society of Magazine Editors

“False Witness,” by Pamela Colloff (New York Times Magazine in partnership with ProPublica): Winner—Reporting
“We’ve Normalized Prison,” by Piper Kerman (Washington Post Magazine): Winner—Single-Topic Issue
“Can We Build a Better Women’s Prison?,” by Keri Blakinger (Washington Post Magazine): Winner—Single-Topic Issue
“Epidemic of Fear,” by Erika Fry (Fortune): Finalist— Reporting
“Las Marthas,” by Jordan Kisner (The Believer): Finalist—Feature Writing
“The Schoolteacher and the Genocide,” by Sarah A. Topol (New York Times Magazine): Winner—Feature Writing
“Unlike Any Other,” by Nick Paumgarten (New Yorker): Finalist—Feature Writing
“Jerry’s Dirt,” by Jacob Baynham (Georgia Review): Winner—Profile Writing
“Elizabeth Warren’s Classroom Strategy,” by Rebecca Traister (New York): Finalist—Profile Writing
“Tactile Art,” by John Lee Clark (Poetry): Winner—Essays and Criticism
“India: Intimations of an Ending,” by Arundhati Roy (The Nation in partnership with Type Media Center): Finalist—Essays and Criticism
“When Disability Is a Toxic Legacy and The Ugly Beautiful and Other Failings of Disability Representation and What We Don’t Talk About When We Talk About Mental Health and Medication,” by s.e. smith (Catapult): Winner—Columns and Commentary
“Kanye West’s Sunday Service Is Full of Longing and Self-Promotion and Love, Death, and Begging for Celebrities to Kill You" and "E. Jean Carroll’s Accusation Against Donald Trump, and the Raising, and Lowering, of the Bar,” by Jia Tolentino (New Yorker): Finalist—Columns and Commentary
“Nothing Sacred and An Assault on the Tongue and Interlopers,” by Ligaya Mishan (T: The New York Times Style Magazine): Finalist—Columns and Commentary
“Our Democracy’s Founding Ideals Were False When They Were Written. Black Americans Have Fought to Make Them True.” by Nikole Hannah-Jones (New York Times Magazine, “The 1619 Project”): Winner—Public Interest
“Fight the Ship,” by T. Christian Miller, Megan Rose, and Robert Faturechi (ProPublica): Finalist—Public Interest
“Under the Ackee Tree,” by Jonathan Escoffery (Paris Review): Winner—ASME Award for Fiction
Permissions
List of Contributors 



Evangelina concepcion / Ani Cooney --
The other child / David Kelly Lawrence --
Summertime / Mohit Manohar --
Cats vs. cancer / Valerie Hegarty --
The water tower and the turtle / Kikuko Tsumara ; translated from the Japanese by Polly Barton --
Failure to thrive / Willa C. Richards --
Gauri kalyanam / Kristen Sahaana Surya --
Dog dreams / Sena Moon --
Bat outta hell / Damitri Martinez --
Madam's sister / Mbozi Haimbe --
Don't go to strangers / Matthew Jeffrey Vegari --
The good, good men / Shannon Snaders.

Responsibility:    edited by Yuka Igarashi.




THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY 2020

Guest Editor: PAISLEY REKDAL
     
Table of Contents

Julia Alvarez, Saving the Children
Appeared in: The Nation

Brandon Amico, Customer Loyalty Program
Appeared in: The Kenyon Review

Rick Barot, from The Galleons
Appeared in: Poetry

Kaveh Bassiri, Invention of I
Appeared in: Copper Nickel

Reginald Dwayne Betts, A Man Drops a Coat on the Sidewalk and Almost Falls into the Arms of Another
Appeared in: Tin House

Ryan Black, Nothing Beats a Fair
Appeared in: The Southern Review

Bruce Bond, Bells
Appeared in: Michigan Quarterly Review

William Brewer, Orange
Appeared in: American Poetry Review

Lucie Brock-Broido, Tender
Appeared in: Parnassus

Victoria Chang, Obit
Appeared in: Mississippi Review

Heather Christle, The Waking Life
Appeared in: Salamander

Ama Codjoe, Becoming a Forest
Appeared in: The Adroit Journal

Meg Day, In Line to Vote on Our Future Climate
Appeared in: Poetry Society of America

Timothy Donnelly, All Through the War
Appeared in: New England Review

Hazem Fahmy, In Which the Devil Asks Me for My Name
Appeared in: Asian American Literary Review

Vievee Francis, The Shore
Appeared in: The Virginia Quarterly Review

Rachel Galvin, Little Death
Appeared in: The Nation

Julian Gewirtz, To X (Written on This Device You Made)
Appeared in: Harvard Review

Regan Good, Birches Are the Gods' Favorite Tree
Appeared in: Copper Nickel

Christine Gosnay, Sex
Appeared in: Poetry

Jorie Graham, It Cannot Be
Appeared in: The New York Review of Books

Samuel Green, On Patmos, Kneeling in the Panagia
Appeared in: Prairie Schooner

B C Griffith, Big Gay Ass Poem
Appeared in: Fence

Rachel Eliza Griffiths, Good Mother
Appeared in: Tin House

Jennifer Grotz, The Conversion of Paul
Appeared in: New England Review

Camille Guthrie, During the Middle Ages
Appeared in: Iowa Review

Janice N. Harrington, Putting the Pieces Together
Appeared in: Poetry Northwest

Tony Hoagland, Sunday at the Mall
Appeared in: New Ohio Review

Kimberly Johnson, Fifteen
Appeared in: The Cincinnati Review

Troy Jollimore, The Garden of Earthly Delights
Appeared in: ZYZZYVA

Ilya Kaminsky, In a Time of Peace
Appeared in: The New Yorker

Douglas Kearney, Sho
Appeared in: Poetry

Donika Kelly, I Never Figured How to Get Free
Appeared in: Poem-a-Day

Christopher Kempf, After,
Appeared in: The Georgia Review

Steven Kleinman, Bear
Appeared in: The Gettysburg Review

Jennifer L. Knox, The Gift
Appeared in: Ploughshares

Yusef Komunyakaa, The Jungle
Appeared in: The New York Review of Books

Corey Van Landingham, Recessional
Appeared in: Pleiades

Nick Lantz, After a Transcript of the Final Voicemails of 9/11 Victims
Appeared in: Copper Nickel

Shara Lessley, On Faith
Appeared in: The Gettysburg Review

Steven Leyva, When I Feel a Whoop Comin' On
Appeared in: jubilat

Cate Lycurgus, Locomotion
Appeared in: The Sewanee Review

Khaled Mattawa, Qassida to the Statue of Sappho in Mytilini
Appeared in: The Kenyon Review

Jennifer Militello, The Punishment of One Is the Love Song of Another
Appeared in: Waxwing

Susan Leslie Moore, Night of the Living
Appeared in: The Commuter

John Murillo, A Refusal to Mourn the Deaths, by Gunfire, of Three Men in Brooklyn
Appeared in: American Poetry Review

Hieu Minh Nguyen, Chasm
Appeared in: The Massachusetts Review

Sharon Olds, Hyacinth Aria
Appeared in: AGNI

Matthew Olzmann, Letter to the Person Who, During the Q&A Session After the Reading, Asked for Career Advice
Appeared in: Waxwing

Paul Otremba, Climate is Something Different
Appeared in: The Kenyon Review

Cecily Parks, The Seeds
Appeared in: New England Review

Carl Phillips, Something to Believe In
Appeared in: Poem-a-Day

Stanley Plumly, At Night
Appeared in: Poem-a-Day

Jana Prikryl, Fox
Appeared in: American Poetry Review

Kevin Prufer, Archaeology
Appeared in: Cherry Tree

Ariana Reines, A Partial History
Appeared in: Poetry

Max Ritvo, The Poorly Built House
Appeared in: Parnassus

Clare Rossini, The Keeper Will Enter the Cage
Appeared in: Parnassus

Robyn Schiff, American Cockroach
Appeared in: The New Yorker

Brandon Som, Shainadas
Appeared in: Poetry Northwest

Jon William Stout, Dysphonia
Appeared in: New England Review

Arthur Sze, Sprang
Appeared in: Mānoa

James Tate, The Prayer
Appeared in: Conduit

Brian Teare, Sitting Isohydric Meditation
Appeared in: New England Review

Craig Morgan Teicher, I Am a Father Now
Appeared in: Conduit

Lynne Thompson, She talk like this 'cause me Mum born elsewhere, say
Appeared in: Pleiades

Matthew Thorburn, The Stag
Appeared in: Cave Wall

Mehrnoosh Torbatnejad, Isfahan, 2010
Appeared in: Michigan Quarterly Review

Rosanna Warren, Samson, 1674
Appeared in: The Paris Review

Robert Wrigley, Machinery
Appeared in: The Georgia Review

Ryo Yamaguchi, Reading Not Reading
Appeared in: Poetry Northwest

John Yao, The President's Telegram
Appeared in: The Massachusetts Review

Emily Yong, Opioid, Alcohol, Despair
Appeared in: The Kenyon Review

Monica Youn, Study of Two Figures (Pasiphaë/Sado)
Appeared in: Poetry

Matthew Zapruder, My Life
Appeared in: The New Yorker


576 pages ; 25 cm
Contents:   

In the event / Meng Jin --
The master's castle / Anthony Doerr --
Blake Griffin dunks over a car / Matthew Olzmann --
Milk / Jane Hirshfield --
Touch / Poppy Sebag-Montefiore --
Upright at Thyatira / Darrell Kinsey --
Late rumspringa / Austin Smith --
The red one who rocks / Aamina Ahmad --
Fall River wife / Peter Orner --
Entreaty / Catherine Pierce --
A town somewhere / Ted Kooser --
Teamwork / Shawn Vestal --
Iowa / T. R. Hummer --
The samples / Kristopher Jansma --
The rules / Leila Chatti --
Post-NICU villanelle / Joyelle McSweeney --
Howl palace / Leigh Newman --
Vows / David Means --
Composed / Brian Swann --
The golden age of television / Karl Taro Greenfeld --
A season in hell with Rimbaud / Dustin Pearson --
The lonely ruralist / Janisse Ray --
Charlie / Colleen O'Brien --
Object lesson / Claire Schwartz --
Aunt Job / Nickalus Rupert --
Fifty-eight percent is concrete road, 12 percent loose sand / David Wojahn --
We at Old Birds welcome messages from God, even if unverifiable / Annie Sheppard --
Alive / Natasha Sajé --
The book of fly / John Philip Johnson --
Anatomy of a Korean inheritance / Esther Ra --
The missing are considered dead / V. V. Ganeshananthan --
The out & proud boy passes the baseball boy / Josh Tvrdy --
Longshore drift / Julia Armfield --
Hoeing beets, 1964, Skagit Valley / Samuel Green --
Marceline wanted a bigger adventure / Shena McAuliffe --
Something street / Carolyn Ferrell --
House of prayer / Alycia Pirmohamed --
Qassida to the statue of Sappho in Mytilini / Khaled Mattawa --
Laramie time / Lydia Conklin --
Meteorology is the science of remembering the sky stays relatively the same / Inam Kang --
The shame exchange / Karen E. Bender --
On the overnight train / Alice Friman --
On the footage of Monet painting / Samuel Cheney --
Sycamore / Stanley Plumly --
Turner's clouds for Plumly / David Baker --
Give my love to the savages / Chris Stuck --
Childish things / Chris Forhan --
Adagio / Robert Pinsky --
Return of the blue nun / Madeline DeFrees --
A beloved duck gets cooked / Lydia Davis --
Letters / Ilya Kaminsky --
Freak corner / John Rolfe Gardiner --
Untitled / T. C. Tolbert --
Rivers / Jo McDougall --
The fifth hour of the night / Frank Bidart --
My father recycles / Naira Kuzmich --
In a good way / Polly Duff Kertis --
And I thought of glass flowers / A. V. Christie --
Chastity / Siqi Liu --
It's not you / Elizabeth McCracken --
Remembering John L'Heureux / Molly Antopol --
The night drinker / Luis Alberto Urrea --
A refusal to mourn the death, by gunfire, of three men in Brooklyn / John Murillo --
Governing bodies / Sangamithra Iyer.

Other Titles:    2021 Pushcart prize XLV :
Pushcart prize 2021
Pushcart prize 45

Responsibility:    edited by Bill Henderson, with the Pushcart Prize editors.


Description:    xix, 243 pages ; 20 cm.

Contents:    

Introduction / Nicholas Royle --
Beyond Criticism / Luke Brown --
Nudibranch / Irenosen Okojie --
The Phone Call / David Constantine --
Vashti / Zakia Uddin --
Energy Thieves: Five Dialogues / Richard Lawrence Bennett --
Halloween / Nicola Freeman --
In the Mountains / Amanthi Harris --
The Girl With the Horizontal Walk / Andrew Hook --
She Said He Said / Hanif Kureishi --
Safely Gathered In / Sarah Schofield --
Belly / Sonia Hope --
The Further Dark / Jeff Noon and Bridget Penney --
Same Same But Different / Stephen Thompson --
Backbone / KJ Orr --
Whale Watching / Diana Powell --
Greetings From the Fat Man in Postcards / David Rose --
The White Cat / NJ Stallard --
Maxine / Tim Etchells --
Dreams Are Contagious / Adrian Slatcher --
Weaning / Helen Mort --
Purity / Robert Stone

Series Title:    Best British Short Stories
Responsibility:    series editor Nicholas Royle.



The Year's Best Science Fiction: Volume 1 • [The Year's Best Science Fiction (Strahan) • 1] • anthology by Jonathan Strahan

Contents 



"The Savannah Problem" by Adam-Troy Castro (Analog, 1-2/19)

"Love in the Time of Immuno-Sharing" by Andy Dudak (Analog, 1-2/19)

"Empty Box" by Allison Mulvihill (Analog, 11-12/19)

"At the Fall" by Alec Nevala-Lee (Analog, 5-6/19)

"Anosognosia" by John Crowley (And Go Like This)

"Tourists" by Rammel Chan (Asimov’s, 3-4/19)

"At the Old Wooden Synagogue on Janower Street" by Michael Libling (Asimov’s, 9-10/19)

"The Ocean Between the Leaves" by Ray Nayler (Asimov’s, 7-8/19)

"Cloud" by Michael Swanwick (Asimov’s, 11-12/19)

"Cloud-Born" by Gregory Feeley (Clarkesworld, 11/19)

"Give the Family My Love" by A.T. Greenblatt (Clarkesworld, 02/2019)

"Tick Tock" by Xia Jia (Clarkesworld, 5/19)

"The Visible Frontier" by Grace Seybold (Clarkesworld, 07/2019)

"Secret Stories of Doors" by Sofia Rhei (Everything is Made of Letters)

"miscellaneous notes from the time an alien came to band camp disguised as my alto sax" by Tina Connolly (F&SF, 3-4/19)

"Mighty are the Meek and the Myriad" by Cassandra Khaw (F&SF, 7-8/19)

"Shucked" by Sam J. Miller (F&SF, 11-12/19)

"How to Kiss a Hojacki" by Debbie Urbanski (F&SF, 5-6/19)

"Green Glass: A Love Story" by E. Lily Yu (If This Goes On, edited by Cat Rambo)

"Fix That House!" by John Kessel (Interzone, 9-10/19)

"Ink, and Breath, and Spring" by Frances Rowat (Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet, 11/19)

"The Death of Fire Station 10" by Ray Nayler (Lightspeed, 10/19)

"The Archronology of Love" by Caroline M. Yoachim (Lightspeed, 04/19)

"The Fine Print" by Chinelo Onwualu, (New Suns, edited by Nisi Shawl)

"The Virtue of Unfaithful Translations" by Minsoo Kang (New Suns, edited by Nisi Shawl)

"Bark, Blood, and Sacrifice" by Alexandra Seidel (Not One of Us, 10/19)

"Mnemosyne" by Catherine MacLeod (On Spec, 04/19)

"A Country Called Winter" by Theodora Goss (Snow White Learns Witchcraft)

"And Now His Lordship is Laughing" by Shiv Ramdas (Strange Horizons, 09/20/19)

"The Girl Who Did Not Know Fear" by Kelly Link (Tin House, Summer 2019)

"The Hundredth House Had No Walls" by Laurie Penny (Tor.com, 09/11/19)

"Knowledgeable Creatures" by Christopher Rowe (Tor.com, 03/06/19)

"Vis Delendi" by Marie Brennan (Uncanny, 3-4/19)

"The Migration Suite: A Study in C Sharp Minor" by Maurice Broaddus (Uncanny, 7-8/19)

"A Catalog of Storms" by Fran Wilde (Uncanny, 1-2/19)




The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2020 • [The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy] • anthology edited by Diana Gabaldon; series editor John Joseph Adams

Contents (view Concise Listing)





The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume 5 • [The Best Science Fiction of the Year • 5] • anthology by Neil Clarke

Contents